4.1.13

Galettes du Roy et Tarte Chèvre et Épinards

From Laudem Gloriae two recipes from la Belle France. It was not possible to redirect these so I send the blog Url and copied them.

I should not do a recipe when I am hungry.

Galettes du Roy.

In France, around the time of the Feast of the Epiphany, one sees patisseries filled with galettes du roi to celebrate the gifts brought by the three kings to the infant Jesus. Several weeks later, the patisserires have emptied of these pastries, except the handful sold at reduced prices. It consists of flaky pastry filled with frangipane, in which is hidden the little figurine (originally porcelaine, now plastic) of a king. The one who receives the piece with the figurine becomes "king" for the day and must offer the next galette. (A similar tradition is held in some of the southern states, including Louisiana, which associates the cake with Mardi Gras.) It has a mild, not oversweet flavor (this is one of the nice things about pastry here--it is sweet enough, and no more), and the pastry is light and flaky. It goes perfectly with a steaming cup of Assam.

500g (17 oz) flaky pastry dough
250g (8.5 oz) of frangipane cream
1 egg
Porcelaine figurine

Pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius (325f). Whip the eggs in a bowl. Roll out half the dough into a flat square. Pour the frangipane into the center in the shape of a circle of about 1-2 cm thickness. Brush the egg on the surrounding dough. Place the figurine anywhere in the cream. Flatten the other half of the dough into a square, and place firmly over the mixture. Cut the dough in a circle around the frangipane and press the edges. Brush egg over the dough. You may make criss-cross designs into the dough with the edge of a knife. Place in the oven for about 20 minutes, or until the dough rises and turns golden brown.

Tarte Chèvre et Épinards

Goat cheese? Spinach? Pastry? What else is there to say? Serves six

Ingredients:
Flaky pastry dough
2 goat cheese logs chopped into 1 cm rolls
400g (32 oz) chopped spinach
4 eggs
Pepper
(optional: grated Gruyère)

Pre-heat the oven to 200 (325f)degrees Celsius. Mix the eggs and grated Gruyère and pepper. Flatten the dough into a 9-inch pie pan. Cover the bottom with spinach. Pour egg mixture over the spinach, and arrange goat cheese on top. Bake for 30 minutes.

Warning: Not good for the figure.


Thanks and a tip of the beret to Christine at Laudem Gloriae.

Merci et remerci.

Brantigny

Galettes des Rois

From Versailles and More,

...Sunday is the feast of the Epiphany (literally “revelation”) celebrating the travels of the three Magi, or Kings of the Orient, who followed a star to Bethlehem to visit Jesus a few days after the Nativity.

French Christmas celebrations conclude with the Epiphany, and with the consumption of vast quantities of galettes des Rois, like the one to the left. They are made of puff pastry filled with marzipan. Each galette is sold with a gilded or silver cardboard crown and contains a fève (“fava bean.”) The fève is no longer a dry bean, but now consists in some decorative charm. My favorites are miniature Nativity scene figures. One must, of course, chew carefully not to break a tooth on the fève...


Thanks and a tip of the beret to Catherine Delors.

I always like the prints she finds to illistrate her post. Here is today's print...

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

Epiphany


Sunday is Epiphany. This date marks the second revealing of the Saviour. The first revealing was on Christmas when Christ was revealed by God to the Jews in the form of the shepherds. The second is Sunday when Christ was revealed to the gentiles, who in the person of the three Kings tradition tells us were from the corners of the (known) world. Sunday the 13th will mark the third revelation at the Baptism of Christ. When the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a Dove, and the Voice of God is heard saying "This is my beloved Son in whom I am well pleased."

Jhesu+Marie
Brantigny

Birthday of Ste. Jeanne d'Arc

The Feast Day of Ste. Jeanne d'Arc is always eclipsed by the Holy Day of Epiphany each year. Yet it is all together proper to remember her each year with a short post just to say that she is remembered.
From Maid of Heaven by the author Ben D. Kennedy

"...Joan of Arc's birth was not officially recorded in the small town where she was born however the people of her town remembered that she was born on Epiphany, or Twelfth-night, which is January 6. The Epiphany celebrates the revelation of God in human form in the person of Jesus Christ and part of the celebration commemorates the arrival of the three "Wise Men" who were led to the baby Jesus by a star in the sky above Bethlehem. It is very significant that Saint Joan was born on Epiphany because she not only led her people to freedom in this world but she ultimately led them, and generations since, to the true freedom that is only found through Jesus Christ.
Saint Joan of Arc is truly a "brilliantly shining light" of the Kingdom of Heaven and will forever point the way to God.

Jehanne d'Arc
Born January 6, 1412
Died May 30, 1431

"It was during the night of the Epiphany that she first saw the light in this mortal life, and, wonderful to relate, the poor inhabitants of the place were seized with an inconceivable joy. Still uninformed of the birth of the Maid, they ran one to the other, enquiring what new thing had happened. For some, it was a cause of fresh rejoicing. What can one add? The cocks, as heralds of the happy news, crowed in a way that had never been heard before, beating their bodies with their wings; continuing for two hours to prophesy this new event."
--Lord Perceval de Boulanivilliers, writing to the Duke of Milan about Joan's birth.

Saint Joan was born in Domremy, a little village in a part of Eastern France known as Lorraine. At her trial of rehabilitation several of the people from Domremy remembered her birth and childhood in the following ways:

"From my childhood I knew Joan the Maid who was born at Domremy to Jacques d'Arc and Isabelle, husband and wife, honest and decent farmers and true Catholics of good repute. I know this because I was often in company with Joan, and being her friend I went to her father's house... Joan was a good, simple and sweet-natured girl, she went often and of her own will to church and the sacred places and often she was ashamed because of people remarking how she went so devoutly to church. I have heard the priest who was there in her time say that she often came to confession. Joan busied herself like any other girl; she did the housework and spun and sometimes, I have seen her, she kept her father's flocks." Hauviette - childhood friend of Joan

"Jeannette, whom this concerns, was born at Domremy and baptized at the Church of St. Remy, a parish of that place. Her father was called Jacques d'Arc and her mother Isabelle, farmers, during their lifetime, at Domremy. From what I saw and knew they were faithful Catholics and hard workers, of good repute and decent conversation, according to their condition; for several times I spoke with them. I was myself one of Jeanne's godfathers... Jeannette in earliest youth, was well and properly brought up in the faith and good conduct and so much so that nearly all the inhabitants of Domremy loved her..." Jean Morea - farmer who knew Joan as a child

"Joan was of my wife Jeanne's kinsfolk. I knew Jacques d'Arc and Isabelle well, the parents of Joan the Maid, good and true Catholics, and of good repute, and I believe that Joan was born in the town of Domremy and that she was baptized at the font of St. Remy in that town. Joan was of good behavior, devout, patient, going readily to church, willingly to confession, and gave alms to the poor when she could, as I witnessed, both in the town of Domremy and at Burey, at my house, where Joan resided during a period of six weeks. Willingly did she work, spinning, ploughing, keeping the cattle, and did other work suitable for women." Durand Laxart - Joan's uncle

"Joan the Maid, in the time of her youth until she left her father's house, was a good, chaste and simple girl, modest in manner, taking not the name of God nor of His saints in vain, fearing God. She went frequently to church and frequently confessed. The cause of my knowing this is that I was, in those days, churchwarden at the church of Domremy and often did I see Joan come to church, to Mass and to Compline. And when I did not ring the bells for Compline, Joan would catch me and scold me, saying that I had not done well; and she even promised to give me some wool if I would be punctual in ringing for Compline..." Perrin Drappier - churchwarden of Domremy in Joan's childhood

"I was brought up with Joan the Maid next door to her father's house. I know that she was good, simple, pious, fearing God and his saints; she went often and of her own will to church and to sacred places, caring for the sick and giving alms to the poor; this I saw myself, for when I was a child I myself was sick and Joan came to comfort me..." Simonin Musnier - farmer and childhood friend of Joan


More on la Pucelle may be found here, here, here, here,and here... or by typing in the word Jehanne in my search area.

Catherine Delors has a view of Jehanne which is from a french stand point, here... it will direct you to another blog as well in true blogger style, Tea at Trianon....here.

A special tip of the beret to Ben Kennedy.

Jhesu+Marie,*
Brantigny

Jhesu maria was placed on her banner specifically to Praise Jesus and Mary and so I use it here.

3.1.13

Ste Geneviève


January 3rd is the Feast of my youngest daughters patron Saint, Ste Geneviève. When she was little and growing up we celebrated this day by doing something special. She went to St Francis of Assisi School in Jacksonville, N.C. We would send cupcakes to her class to help her celebrate the feast day with her class. Early on both my wife and I looked to this dear Saint to guide our treasure and preserve her.

Sainte-Geneviève is often forgotten now, except maybe by the French. The magnificent Church dedicated to her,was allowed to run into decay, was restored by Louis XV, then desecrated by the mob in 1791 and was renamed the Pantheon, a name by which it is now more commonly known. Her bones were shattered and destroyed, burned in the police yard. Yet some of her relics still exist and continue to provide cures to the lame and infirm who come to ask her blessing and intersession.

Sainte-Geneviève

She is Patroness of Paris, born at Nanterre, about 419 or 422; and died in Paris, 512.

Her feast is kept on 3 January. She was the daughter of Severus and Gerontia; popular tradition represents her parents as poor peasants, though it seems more likely that they were wealthy and respectable townspeople.

In 429 St. Germain of Auxerre and St. Lupus of Troyes were sent across from Gaul to Britain to combat Pelagianism. On their way they stopped at Nanterre, a small village about eight miles from Paris. The inhabitants flocked out to welcome them, and St. Germain preached to the assembled multitude. It chanced that the pious demeanour and thoughtfulness of a young girl among his hearers attracted his attention. After the sermon he caused the child to be brought to him, spoke to her with interest, and encouraged her to persevere in the path of virtue. Learning that she was anxious to devote herself to the service of God, he interviewed her parents, and foretold them that their child would lead a life of sanctity and by her example and instruction bring many virgins to consecrate themselves to God. Before parting next morning he saw her again, and on her renewing her consecration he blessed her and gave her a medal engraved with a cross, telling her to keep it in remembrance of her dedication to Christ. He exhorted her likewise to be content with the medal, and wear it instead of her pearls and golden ornaments. There seem to have been no convents near her village; and Genevieve, like so many others who wished to practise religious virtue, remained at home, leading an innocent, prayerful life. It is uncertain when she formally received the religious veil. Some writers assert that it was on the occasion of St. Gregory's return from his mission to Britain; others say she received it about her sixteenth year, along with two companions, from the hands of the Bishop of Paris. On the death of her parents she went to Paris, and lived with her godmother. She devoted herself to works of charity and practised severe corporal austerities, abstaining completely from flesh meat and breaking her fast only twice in the week. These mortifications she continued for over thirty years, until her ecclesiastical superiors thought it their duty to make her diminish her austerities.

Many of her neighbours, filled with jealousy and envy, accused Genevieve of being an impostor and a hypocrite. Like Blessed Joan of Arc, in later times, she had frequent communion with the other world, but her visions and prophecies were treated as frauds and deceits. Her enemies conspired to drown her; but, through the intervention of Germain of Auxerre, their animosity was finally overcome. The bishop of the city appointed her to look after the welfare of the virgins dedicated to God, and by her instruction and example she led them to a high degree of sanctity.

In 451 Attila and his Huns were sweeping over Gaul; and the inhabitants of Paris prepared to flee. Genevieve encouraged them to hope and trust in God; she urged them to do works of penance, and added that if they did so the town would be spared. Her exhortations prevailed; the citizens recovered their calm, and Attila's hordes turned off towards Orléans, leaving Paris untouched. Some years later Merowig (Mérovée) took Paris; during that siege Genevieve distinguished herself by her charity and self- sacrifice. Through her influence Merowig and his successors, Childeric and Clovis, displayed unwonted clemency towards the citizens. It was she, too, who first formed the plan of erecting a church in Paris in honour of Saints Peter and Paul. It was begun by Clovis at Mont-lès-Paris, shortly before his death in 511. Genevieve died the following year, and when the church was completed her body was interred within it. This fact, and the numerous miracles wrought at her tomb, caused the name of Sainte-Geneviève to be given to it. Kings, princes, and people enriched it with their gifts. In 847 it was plundered by the Normans and was partially rebuilt, but was completed only in 1177. This church having fallen into decay once more, Louis XV began the construction of a new church in 1764. The Revolution broke out before it was dedicated, and it was taken over in 1791, under the name of the Panthéon, by the Constituent Assembly, to be a burial place for distinguished Frenchmen. It was restored to Catholic purposes in 1821 and 1852, having been secularized as a national mausoleum in 1831 and, finally, in 1885. St. Genevieve's relics were preserved in her church, with great devotion, for centuries, and Paris received striking proof of the efficacy of her intercession.

She saved the city from complete inundation in 834. In 1129 a violent plague, known as the mal des ardents, carried off over 14,000 victims, but it ceased suddenly during a procession in her honour. Innocent II, who had come to Paris to implore the king's help against the Antipope Anacletus in 1130, examined personally into the miracle and was so convinced of its authenticity that he ordered a feast to be kept annually in honour of the event on 26 November. A small church, called Sainte-Geneviève des Ardents, commemorated the miracle till 1747, when it was pulled down to make room for the Foundling Hospital. The saint's relics were carried in procession yearly to the cathedral, and Mme de Sévigné gives a description of the pageant in one of her letters.

The revolutionaries of 1793 destroyed most of the relics preserved in St. Genevieve's church, and the rest were cast to the winds by the mob in 1871. Fortunately, however, a large relic had been kept at Verneuil, Oise, in the eighteenth century, and is still extant. The church built by Clovis was entrusted to the Benedictines. In the ninth century they were replaced by secular canons. In 1148, under Eugene III and Louis VII, canons from St. Victor's Abbey at Senlis were introduced. About 1619 Louis XIII named Cardinal François de La Rochefoucauld Abbot of St. Genevieve's. The canons had been lax and the cardinal selected Charles Faure to reform them. This holy man was born in 1594, and entered the canons regular at Senlis. He was remarkable for his piety, and, when ordained, succeeded after a hard struggle in reforming the abbey. Many of the houses of the canons regular adopted his reform. He and a dozen companions took charge of Sainte-Geneviève-du-Mont, at Paris, in 1634. This became the mother-house of a new congregation, the Canons Regular of St. Genevieve, which spread widely over France. Another institute called after the saint was the Daughters of St. Genevieve, founded at Paris, in 1636, by Francesca de Blosset, with the object of nursing the sick and teaching young girls. A somewhat similar institute, popularly known as the Miramiones, had been founded under the invocation of the Holy Trinity, in 1611, by Marie Bonneau de Rubella Beauharnais de Miramion. These two institutes were united in 1665, and the associates called the Canonesses of St. Geneviève. The members took no vows, but merely promised obedience to the rules as long as they remained in the institute. Suppressed during the Revolution, it was revived in 1806 by Jeanne-Claude Jacoulet under the name of the Sisters of the Holy Family. They now have charge of over 150 schools and orphanages.

For Geneviève Suzanne Thérèse-Bernardette, notre chou d'Amour.

Jhesu+Marie
Brantigny


Tomb of Ste Geneviève

Portrait by by Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun 1821