20.7.12

Anglican Orders Valid or Not? Anglican Eucharist, Valid or Not?

Today I post two articles, one written by a former Anglican minister and the other by a current Anglican minister. As a Catholic I believe the Catholic pronouncement that Anglican orders are not valid, by extension therefore the Anglican Eucharist is not valid and the reasons they are not.

The substance of this post is near to my heart as my daughter is married to a man who is an Epsicopalian and the son of a very Holy Episcopalian priest. Are Anglican Orders Valid, and Is Anglican Eucharist Valid or not?

First I present the link to the Anglican view on Holy Orders...

The Validity of Anglican Orders

By the Reverend William J. Alberts

IT is a not unusual experience for an Anglican, entering a Roman Catholic Church, to find, prominently displayed in a tract case, some pamphlet attacking the validity of Anglican Orders. In fact, this is one of the favorite topics of Roman authors.
Controversy is frequently unpleasant and always a possible source of that vicious lack of charity which every Christian ought to try to avoid. Nevertheless, necessity is laid upon us to try to present our answer to the charges which Roman Catholics make against the validity of our Orders, and consequently against the Catholic heritage of our beloved Church and the validity of our Sacraments.

Let it be stated at once that this article will not be exhaustive, nor will it be able within its brief compass to give detailed references. All it will attempt is a statement of the main Roman Catholic objections to the validity of our orders and to indicate a brief reply to them.

According to generally accepted Catholic practice no sacraments are valid in which there is a defect of matter, form, or intention. By 'matter' is meant some external thing which is used in conjunction with the administration of a particular sacrament. An example of such matter would be the water used in Holy Baptism. By 'form' is meant the words which give signification to the use to which the matter is being put. An example of 'form' would be the words 'John, I baptize thee, in the Name, etc.,' at Baptism. By 'intention' is meant that in conferring a sacrament the minister must have at least a virtual intention of doing what the Church does. Any supposed sacramental rite which was deficient in one or more of these three requisites would be invalid and would lack the assurance which Catholic Sacraments give: that they are the very means by which God bestows upon His children the particular grace for which the Sacrament was instituted.

The guarantor of sacramental grace is, humanly speaking, the Episcopate: no Bishop, no Church, no Sacraments, no divinely assured salvation. It is therefore of utmost importance that we be assured that our orders of ministers are valid, that is to say, that they are the same which our Lord gave to the Apostles and which the Apostles transmitted to other fit men to be the means of continuing in union with the divine Head of the Church, Jesus Christ, our Lord.
Continue reading here...

And now for the Catholic view on why the Anglican Eucharist is not valid...

Do Anglicans Have a Valid Eucharist?
by Dr. Taylor Marshall

...I received an email from Harry after the EWTN The Journey Home interview on July 2 asking this same question: Do Anglicans have a valid Mass?

Here's the short answer: No, Anglicans or Episcopalians (the tradition deriving from Henry VIII's Church of England) do not have a valid Eucharist. This question was settled by His Holiness Pope Leo XIII in his papal bull Apostolicae Curae on the nullity of Anglican orders, issued 18 September, 1896.

There are two reasons for the nullity of Anglican Holy Orders. After explaining these two reasons, I'll respond to the objection that Anglicans/Episcopalians have since "revitalized" their Apostolic Succession through the intervention of schismatic bishops of the Old Catholic/Orthodox/Polish National Catholic communities.

There are two reasons for the invalidity of Anglican Orders and Eucharist:

First Reason Against Anglican Eucharist: Invalid Form of Priestly Ordination
In 1550, Archbishop Thomas Cranmer (a convinced Protestant) changed the ordination rite for bishops, priests, and deacons. Sacerdotal language was removed and the Roman form was abolished. Without valid bishops, you don't have valid priests. Without valid priests, you don't have valid Eucharists. If you don't have valid Eucharists, you don't have the Real Presence of the Blessed Sacrament...
continue here...

A great thanks to Stephanie A. Mann whose blog Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation has been a treasure trouve of historical facts on the Reformation in England.

One question of my own I must add, "Why should Anglicans worry so much about the validity and sucession of their Orders if they are not part of the Catholic Church?"

Jhesu=Marie,
Branigny

8 comments:

Peterman said...

Wow, so there were some out there that thought they were valid? Haha, that's the best laugh I've had today.

Sorry to all Anglicans out there but your church was started by a man who wanted a divorce.

Anonymous said...

Richard,

For this very reason, JPII in the early 1980's gave Catholic Christianity the 'Anglican Use' liturgy. Further to this, Benedict XVI back in 2009 instigated the Anglican ordinariate structure, liturgy and way...for what is in effect an English or 'Sarum' rite to be rekindled over 500 years post reformation (it existed prior to the English reformation) in which Anglican language, patrimony and reverence can be completely preserved within a Catholic framework in much the same way the Marounite rite functions; that is, with its unique liturgy and spirituality whilst comporting to and believing in the Catechism of the Catholic Church and Canon law.

In the UK the Anglican Ordinariate of our Lady of Walsingham is the structure in place, in Australia, as of 15 June, (only in Western Australia thus far) the Anglican Ordinariate structure is the Anglican Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross (not certain of the structure's name in North America).

For your son in law, this is a valid and perfectly acceptable option. And for you, you are also permitted to fully participate, as you are in an Eastern rite of the Catholic Church whenever you wish.

This is it; whole congregations have come across, scores of priests and not a few bishops.

Blessings,

Sarah,
Australia.

Brantigny said...

SARAH, My son in law hopefully will become a Catholic in the true sense. His Father is a priest in that faith. Hs wife and my Grandaughter are Catholic, he attends most Masses, 'cept when his dad is down. I know it is most confusing for him especially when we have such a good priest.

Anonymous said...

Richard,

The Anglican Ordinariate is a valid form of Catholic Christianity (though to many the standing of the ordinariate is confusing. It's legitimate and perfectly Licit. Long Live Benedict XVI for his foresight visible in his establishment of the AO.

I have received some fabulous news of late, the latin mass is available in accessible format, including Braille, for anyone who wishes to avail themselves of it, as are a collection of latin prayers through Xavier Society for the Blind
www.xaviersocietyfortheblind.org
(telephone and ask if required). I learnt of this last night and will be calling them this evening my time, as soon as business hours commence in NYC.
though a Marounite, i intend to avail myself of this material for my Christian resources collection (I plan on attending mass at St. marys Cathedral in Sydney's CBD every month to six weeks and much of its service is in latin).

Blessings,

Sarah,
Australia.

Brantigny said...

Sarah! That is so good. I love getting your letters, you are so full of hope and light it radiates in your messages. It sounds like things are getting better for you as you grow in your faith.
Richard

Anonymous said...

Richard,

Thank you. I can asure you, things are tough, brother. Faith-wise, struggle seams to be my lot as the enemy seeks to cause torment with one thing or another. All I can do is trust in the Word of God, His body (both in terms of the Church and the Eucharist), plus the sacraments/sacramentals. No sooner has one thing been dealt with than another raises its head unbidden. Sometimes I feel as if I am being warred over. All I can do is trust in the love and mercy of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, plus His mother to guide me to Him.

Blessings,

Sarah.

Brantigny said...

You are being fought over. Jesus on one side and satan on the other.
Satan has a mode of trying to corrupt Jesus' faithful.

Richard

Anonymous said...

Richard,

All I can do is pray that I do not fall prey to the entrapment of the enemy...any progress on my part is clawed and struggled for, one difficult foothold after another. The only thing that gives me hope in any of this is the sacrifice made and paid for me by our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, for with His passion, crucifiction, death, resurrection, assention and intercession the serpent's head was finally crushed. All that keeps one going is the fact that Christ Jesus is far, far stronger than the father of lies.Will things even out?

Blessings,

Sarah,
Australia.