10.4.10

Polish leader, 95 others dead in Russia jet crash




The world mourns today at the news of the death Lech Kaczynski and the others killed over Russia today.

By JIM HEINTZ, Associated Press

...MOSCOW – Polish President Lech Kaczynski and some of the country's highest military and civilian leaders died on Saturday when the presidential plane crashed as it came in for a landing in thick fog in western Russia, killing 96, officials said.

Russian and Polish officials said there were no survivors on the 26-year-old Tupolev, which was taking the president, his wife and staff to events marking the 70th anniversary of the massacre in Katyn forest of thousands of Polish officers by Soviet secret police...
more

Rest in Peace.

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

9.4.10

Not by the Bible Alone...

Carlos has this insight on his blog The Mystery Horn

The Protestant doctrine commonly known as "Sola Scriptura" does not come from Sacred Scripture. That doctrine asserts that any reader of the Bible can interpret Scripture, without error, thanks to the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. In short, it guarantees infallibility to any person who simply reads the Bible, regardless of whether or not that person has any education or sense or is living out a Christian life and spirituality. It is, therefore, a very dangerous doctrine since it leaves faithful Christians and believers exposed to unscrupulous leaders who don't have to answer to anyone for their actions. In the words of the author Robert Sungenis, "Fallible men will invariably produce fallible interpretations of Scripture." Our Lord and Savior loves us too much to leave us under the dangerous influence of "false prophets, who come to you in sheep's clothing, but underneath are ravenous wolves." (Matthew 7, 15). For that reason, He established His Church, ordering Peter to care for His sheep (John 21, 16) and promising him that he would send His Spirit to guide the Church to all truth as explained in John 16, 13...

Nowhere has God said that he would protect his sheep by providing them with the Scriptures. Instead, he raises up leaders from among the community for them to follow, shepherds that He uses to guide them. Even in the present day, God continues to act in this same way.

The Canon of Scripture was established by Pope Saint Damasus I around the year 400 B.C. Prior to that, there was no agreement in the primitive Church concerning which—among the hundreds of texts considered by some to be sacred—were actually inspired. So for almost 400 years—a considerable amount of time—there was no Bible that served as a reference for Christians. All those who learned the faith were instructed by others—following the same method used by the apostles. Eventually, the Church in her authority, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, determined the canon of Scripture that provided the believers with a trustworthy reference when building faith. If we believe that Scripture is truly inspired, it can be deduced naturally that the Church is infallible, since it was by her authority—not by Scripture itself—that those writings were declared specifically inspired by God. However, if the Church is not infallible in her teachings, we cannot assume that Scriptures validated by her are inspired by God, given that, the authority that declared them as such, would not be worthy of trust. Therefore, it cannot at the same time be asserted that the Catholic Church can err without condemning, at the same time, the origin and selection of Scripture that she passed on. Trusting the Bible and distrusting the Church that compiled, presented and later protected the Bible throughout time is something that betrays both logic and history. Without the Catholic Church, the Bible never would have existed.
More...

Thanksd and A tip of the beret to Carlos...

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

Easter Friday

Have you ever noticed that after the resurrection that the resurrected Jesus was frequently recognized by the disciples at meal times? Spirits do not eat, and Jesus Rose to a perfected body. Catholic Fire has posted the following video...

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

Eleanor of Aquitaine and Alaïs of France: a study in contrasts

Katherine Delors has invited a guest authoress Christy English, whose début novel, The Queen's Pawn, has just been released, discusses the contrasts of the real Eleanor and Alaïs...

Above, the dust of ages past covers the stone effigies of Eleanor and Henry II.

"...Eleanor of Aquitaine was an amazing woman. She was a brilliant politician and an heiress rarely seen in any age. The lands she inherited from her father stretched over what is now most of southern France. The power and wealth that those lands gave Eleanor served her all her life, as first she married Louis VII of France, and later when she married the man who would become King Henry II of England. At every moment of her life, Eleanor made hard choices, and she lived with the consequences of the choices she made..."More...

Both of these women lived in a time when women like children were better seen and not heard.

Thanks and a tip of the beret to both Christy English and Katherine Delors. How does Shakespeare say it? "...two of the fairest stars in all the heaven..." You give me such good ideas for presents...

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

* I prefer Aliénor d’Aquitaine, or Éléonore de Guyenne, to this spelling of Eleanor, they are more French.

8.4.10

..Vaguely familiar..

The following excerpt form today post on Tea at Trianon, sounded vaguely familiar to me today as it reminded me of a "Christian Service" on the radio one late night.The same argument is made by several denominations.

...In the first place, they usually say of themselves that they are good Christians, who do not swear, or lie, or speak evil of others; that they do not kill any man or animal, nor anything having the breath of life, and that they hold the faith of the Lord Jesus Christ and his gospel as the apostles taught. They assert that they occupy the place of the apostles, and that, on account of the above-mentioned things, they of the Roman Church, namely the prelates, clerks, and monks, and especially the inquisitors of heresy persecute them and call them heretics, although they are good men and good Christians, and that they are persecuted just as Christ and his apostles were by the Pharisees... more.

“Plus ça change, plus çe la meme chose”.
"The more things change, the more they stay the same".

There is no such a thing as a new heresy...

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

The Catholic Man's Dress Code

Nicholas D.C. Wansbutter is perfectly correct in this observation on men's clothing...

...Men ought not get a "free pass". On the contrary, as the leaders, we must hold ourselves to the highest standards. But what ought those to be? While the idea of wearing tunics and cloaks hearkening back to the golden age of Christendom might be attractive, but we must not make of ourselves social pariahs. This would be totally counterproductive, and has been warned against by Pope Pius XII in some of the same quotes where he condemns immodest modern fashions... more...

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

7.4.10

The Normans, Hastings, 1066 and all that...

It is not possible to fully realize the significance of the Normans in the history of the world. Most of the world no doubt knows about the Battle of Hastings and the conquer of the Saxons. The mere use of the name Normans troubles the English less, I think, than if they were called Frenchmen. Yet one must remember that in England at least until the latter half of the Hundred Years War (1336 -1453) it was French that was spoken and not English.

While it is true that the Angles, Jutes and Saxons created England it was the Normans who laid the foundations of what was to become the United Kingdom of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The fact that a descendant of William the Conqueror is the current Queen Elizabeth II speaks volumes. However less well grasped in this country is the fact that the Italian, and Sicilian Norman dynasties survived at least until the Italian Unification. In addition the Normans were instrumental in the Crusades in the Holy Land and the formation of the Principalities of Edessa, Antioch and the Kingdom of Jerusalem. The title of the King of Jerusalem is currently held by Louis-Alphonse, who as King of France will be called Louis XX.

These Gens Normannorum the Norman people have and continue to have a certain cultural identity which has become a hallmark of their Normanness. Although it has became the fashion in the world to identify a people with their country, the Normans have fierté raciale away of doing things which is entirely Norman in character.

In 10th century France the similarity between Norman and Viking was so close as to be indistinguishable. The Viking habitual blending and merging with the local population, in customs, language and religion, began to move them from their Vikingness and replace it with this Normanness.

The region of France which we now call Normandy is not a creation of the Normans. It comprises the ancient church province of Rouen. The area was originally populated by Gallo-Romans, Germanic tribes and Franks. About 480 this area came under the domain of Clovis (from whom the name Louis derives), and remained under French control at least nominally until 911. It was in this year that Rollo, a leader of Scandinavian settlers along the Seine River demanded that his occupation be recognized by Charles III. The occupation was agreed to most likely in light of the acceptance by the Scandinavians of the Catholic Faith and as a defense against further viking encroachment. Rollo also agreed to give military aid to the French king. The fiefdom of Normandy was created for the Viking leader now also known as Robert of Normandy.

By 623 Rollo had acquired control of all the Scandinavian settlers in the Rouen province. He turned Rouen into a prosperous city which traded with Scandinavia, and with those places in northern England control such as York(1). The descendants of Rollo and his followers adopted the local Gallo-Romantic language and intermarried with the area’s previous inhabitants and became the Normans – a Norman French-speaking mixture of Scandinavians, Hiberno-Norse, Orcadians, Anglo-Danish, and indigenous Franks and Gauls.

William, Duke of Normandy.

Rollo died in 931. From his wife Poppa he had William called Longsword, who married Sprota, from whom issued Richard I. Longsword died in 996. and was succeeded by Richard I called The Fearless. Richard married Gunnor, by whom issued, Richard II, called the good. Richard II married Judith of Rennes. Their issue was Richard also called "the Good" who died in 1029, passing the Duchy to his brother Robert I. A third son was born who became a monk. Robert I was called the Magnificent. Robert had an illegitimate affair with Harleve (or Harlette, guess what name derives from that) the daughter of a tanner. From this liason, William, soon to be called the Conqueror was born. In his youth he was called Duke of Normandy but most often William the Bastard. (le Batard)

Upon accession to Duke at age 8 William through his guardians began a series of allegiances and wars in order to stabilize his control over Normandy. The borders of Normandy pushed back those of Brittany. At age 15 William was knighted. One story concerns the city of Alençon. During the 10th century, Alençon was a buffer state between Normandy and the Maine regions. In 1047, William laid siege to the town. The citizens sought to insult William by hanging animal skins from the walls in reference to his ancestry as the illegitimate son of Duke Robert and a tanner's daughter. On capturing the town, William had the citizens' hands cut off in revenge. By the time William turned 19 he was successfully dealing with threats of rebellion and invasion. With the assistance of Henry I, King of France, William finally secured control of Normandy by defeating rebel Norman barons at Caen in the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes in 1047, obtaining the Truce of God, which was backed by the Roman Catholic Church.

William married Matilda of Flanders in 1053 at Eu in the Cathedral of Notre Dame. This marriage was strictly against the wishes of the Church due to a question of consanguinity, as Matilda and William were distant cousins. Their marriage is said to have been made out of love and not for political reasons. He was 24 and he was 22. Matilda faithfully presented William with 4 sons and 6 daughters. In repentance for going against the church they donated 2 churches, St Stephens from him and Sainte Trinité.

Williams domain was invaded twice by Henry I, because Henry felt William had become too powerful. Both invasions were repulsed weakening the prestige and power of the French King. Later in 1062 William invaded and took control of Maine to the north of Normandy.

A matter of Succession

Edward King of England, remembered as The Confessor died in January 1066. In accordance with Saxon custom and Edwards will, the Witenagemot had Harold Godwinson crowned King. The English throne was still contested by William who had a claim through his distant aunt Emma. William claimed Edward had promised the throne to William while Edward was in exile in Normandy during the Danish occupation of England. It was William who knighted Harold after he rescued him from the Count of Ponthieu. Together they defeated Conan II Count of Brittany. On this occasion William had Harold swear allegiance to him over the bones of a saint. At the conclusion of the dubbing Harold was shown the bones. This particular incident was instrumental in getting the Popes permission to invade England, and the excommunication of Harold. This spectacular feat of propaganda placed Harold under edict and excommunicated anyone, soldiers included, who aided him.

Prior to leaving France William gathered together his own knights, and their retainers, those of his ally from Maine, Flanders, Brettanie and numbers of "Freelances'. These Freelances were knights who owed fealty to no Lord, and sold there serves at battle to battle. They gathered at Caen on the coast of Normandy. Some knights came from as far away as Italy moved by the promise of lands and titles. William had assembled a fleet of about 700 ships(2). While there, William had constructed, wooden castles, which could be taken down and rebuilt elsewhere. William then waited for the winds to shift.

In September 1066, William set sail for Saxon England was delayed for a time but finally landed in England at Bulverhythe, unopposed. He was two miles from Senlac hill upon which the battle was to be fought. Meanwhile Harold who had moved to the north to repulse a danish threat from another Harold, Hardraga. On 25 September 1066 the Saxon Thegns destroyed the Danish army at Stamford Bridge near the Danish city of York. Turning south Harold hurriedly marched his army to meet the threat of William at Hastings. After a short rest he arrived at Hastings on 12 October 1066.

Hastings and the end of Saxon England

The start of the Norman Conquest of England was the battle of Hastings in Sussex. The story may be quickly told, but first something about the opposing armies, the Norman army numbered upwards of 8500. it was composed of about 2000 cavalry, knights with lances, 4500 heavy infantry, somewhat armored carrying spears and battle axes, and 2000 light infantry consisting of archers, crossbowmen and slingers. The usual Norman method of fighting at this stage was to use the light infantry to weaken the opposition with arrows followed by and advance by the heavy infantry. When gaps were opened in the opposing lines they would attack with the mounted knights, on large Norman horses, charging knee to knee to carry home an attack, crushing the enemy as much by the use of lances as with the weight of the horse. Armored knights were the tanks of the middle ages.

Significant to the Normans they incorporated a weapon that had been unseen in warfare, but which had such an impact that cavalry thereafter used it. This weapon was the stirrup. Until it was invented by the Normans the army might ride on horses to a battle (such as the Saxons here at Hastings) but they fought on foot. The stirrup provided the knight a platform on which to stand, control the horse, (his hands would be busy with his lozenge shaped shield and his lance) and thrust with his lance. The knight was covered from head to knee with chain mail. Chain mail was made from thousands of links of loops entwined together. It was mostly impervious to sword and arrow. It allowed the knight freedom of movement and it weighed about 50 lbs. Upon his head he wore a conical helmet, with a piece of steel covering his nose called a nasal. This was the real power of the Normans.

On the other side the Saxon Fyrd, as the army was called, consisted of thegns, who were basically dressed the same as their Norman counterparts, the biggest noticeable difference would appear to be the lack of mounted knights and the use of a more Viking shield, being round. The favored tactic of this Saxon Fyrd was the "shield wall", an almost impenetrable wall formed by interlocking the shields of the front ranks together. It was the most effective defense against the Norman archers.

The 14th of October was a Saturday. The Normans arrived on the sight of the battle and formed below the Senlec hill and the Saxon position. Both armies were approximately the same size. The Norman army deployed in the typical Norman fashion. The Franco-Flemmish formed on the right, the Normans in the center, and the Breton's to the left. The archers and crossbowmen stood in front of the army.

An apocryphal story described the beginning of the battle. It seems William had a minstrel, a knight named Ivo Taillefer. At the onset of the battle Ivo requested and received permission to strike the first blow. Ivo rode towards the Saxon line, singing the Song of Roland. It is said he attacked straight into the Saxons killing two or three before being killed himself.(3)

Selac Hill was chosen by the Saxons after a race of sorts. Both sides realized the importance of the high ground. The Saxons won the high ground and had all around visibility. The Saxon shield wall could extend all around the the Saxon defenses where improved by having interior lines, where a flagging side could be reinforced quickly with out having to expose themselves to the Normans before assuming their place.

The attack began in earnest. The Normans attacked as soon as they formed for battle, hurling arrows upon the Saxon ferd, most however had little effect because of the shield wall. Thinking that the Saxons had been weaken William attack with his infantry. Many of the Norman infantry were killed in the charge up the hill, as the fyrd threw javelins, stones and anything they could find. Thus weakened, the Normans reached the sheild wall and close, hand-to-hand combat occured. The "dead had bearly a place to fall" wrote a conicler of the engagement.

William was then told that the shield wall stood. He decided to attack with his cavalry. The horses surprised at the sight of the shields simply refused to crash into them. The Norman cavalry, who were trained to fight knee to knee were compelled to attack one at a time and throw their javelins at the Saxon defenders. After about an hour the Bretons were obliged to break and fell away. The Norman and Flemish troops fearing they would have their flank turned also broke of action and fled down the hill.

Seeing the Normans retreat the Saxons broke their shield wall and pursued, among them were the brothers of Harold. In was during this attack that William's horse was killed and he fell. Fearing the death of their leader many Normans panicked and were prepared to fly. It a scene which is reminiscent of the Maid at the Tourelles, William mounted another horse and raising his helmet to show his face. by this act he rallied his men to renew the fight.(4)

Rallying the Normans began a counter attack upon the fyrd, driving them headlong back to the top of the hill. Many of the Saxon number lay dead now in the field before them. Many of the dead were the more highly disciplined Saxon huscarls, and the shield wall began to falter. William realized this and devised a new strategy. He commanded the archers to fire over the shields into the rear of the opposite side of defenses, because the direct shooting onto the shield wall produced no effect. Arrows fell into the clusters of the Saxon's who were huddled behind the shield wall. It is said that this was the moment that Harold was shot in the eye and was killed. This particular bit of information has been believed for almost a thousand years, because it was thus shown on the Bayeux Tapestry(5)

The Normans pressed home their advantage, the fighting which was hand to hand in the brutal medieval way, could only end with the destruction of Harold's army. The fyrd now fled the battlefield, the Huscarls loyal to Harold surrounded his body and were killed to the last man. William had the bodies cleared from the field, and pitched his tent and had a celebratory dinner.

Jhesu+Marie,

Brantigny

notes-
(1)York or Jorvik. The Vikings captured the city in 866, renaming it Jórvík, the capital of a wider kingdom of the same name covering much of Northern England. Around the year 1000, the city became known as York.
(2)By comaparison the fleet that assaulted Normandy on 6 June 1944 numbered 6939 ships of all types.
(3)An early account of this feat is found in the (in The Carmen de Hastingae Proelio) says that an English champion came from the ranks, and Taillefer quickly slew him, taking his head as a trophy to William.
(4)Their are many historians who believe that Williams men purposely feigned retreat in order to get the Saxons to break ranks. The feigned retreat was a favorite tactic used by the Normans in the wars to expand Normandy. It worked well there.
(5)Was Harold hit in the eye, by an arrow? The only evidence we have about Harold's death comes from the Bayeux Tapestry, however, we will probably never know how he died, what we do know is his illegitemate wife Ealdgyth Swanneschals looked for his body among the dead at Senlac hill and identified him by "marks" known only to her, (lovebites).

To hear the pre-Norman Saxon tongue here...

To hear the Norman tongue recite a line from the Song of Roland, go here...

Life in Viking Jorvik, may be found here...

For the Dudo of St. Quentin's Gesta Normannorum go here...

6.4.10

Healthcare tax overhaul...

I have moved this article to my other blog, Of Jacobins and Girondins as it did not belong on this blog.

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

Tempête sur la pointe de Bretagne

...Tu m'as jeté au fond, au cœur de la mer, et le courant m'a environné; tous tes flots et toutes tes vagues ont passé sur moi;.. Jonas 2:3 Douay Rheims



Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

And thou hast cast me forth into the deep in the heart of the sea, and a flood hath compassed me: all thy billows, and thy waves have passed over me. Jonah 2:3Douay-Rheims

Vision of St. John Bosco

THE VISION OF THE TWO COLUMNS

"...On May 30, 1862, Don Bosco recounted that, in a dream, he had seen an immense sea, on which a great many ships were arranged for battle, against a larger and taller ship. He also saw others which were defending the tall ship. Here are his words: "In the midst of this endless sea, two solid columns, a short distance apart, soar high into the sky. One is surmounted by a statue of the Immaculate Virgin, at whose feet a large inscription reads: 'Auxilium Christianorum,' ('Help of Christians'). The other, far loftier and sturdier, supports a Host of Proportionate size, and bears beneath it the inscription: 'Salus credentium,' ('Salvation of believers'). "The flagship commander the Roman Pontiff standing at the helm, strains every muscle to steer his ship between the two columns, from whose summit hang many anchors, and strong hooks linked to chains. The entire enemy fleet closes in, to intercept and sink the flagship at all costs. They bombard it with everything they have: books and pamphlets, incendiary bombs, firearms, cannons. The battle rages ever more furious. Beaked prows ram the flagship again and again, but to no avail, as, unscathed and undaunted, it keeps on its course. At times a formidable ram splinters a gaping hole into its hull, but, immediately, a breeze from the two columns instantly seals the gash.

"Meanwhile, enemy cannons blow up; firearms and beaks fall to pieces; ships crack up and sink to the bottom. In a blind fury, the enemy takes to hand to hand combat, cursing and blaspheming. Suddenly the Pope falls, seriously wounded. He is instantly helped up, but, struck a second time, dies. A shout of victory rises from the enemy, and wild rejoicing sweeps their ships. But no sooner is the Pope dead, than another takes his place. The captains of the auxiliary ships elected him so quickly, that the news of the Pope's death coincides with that of his successor's election. The enemy's self assurance wanes.

"Breaking through all resistance, the new Pope steers his ships safely between the two coiumns; first, to the one surmounted by the Host, and then to the other, topped by the statue of the Virgin. At this point, something unexpected happens. The enemy ships panic and disperse, colliding with and scuttling each other.

"Some auxiliary ships, which had gallantly fought alongside their flagship, are the first to tie up at the two columns. Many others, which had fearfully kept far away from the fight, stand still, cautiously waiting until the wrecked enemy ships vanish under the waves. Then they, too, head for the two columns, tie up at the swinging hooks, and ride safe and tranquil beside their flagship. A great calm now covers the sea." THE VISION OF THE TWO COLUMNS:

On May 30, 1862, Don Bosco recounted that, in a dream, he had seen an immense sea, on which a great many ships were arranged for battle, against a larger and taller ship. He also saw others which were defending the tall ship. Here are his words: "In the midst of this endless sea, two solid columns, a short distance apart, soar high into the sky. One is surmounted by a statue of the Immaculate Virgin, at whose feet a large inscription reads: 'Auxilium Christianorum,' ('Help of Christians'). The other, far loftier and sturdier, supports a Host of Proportionate size, and bears beneath it the inscription: 'Salus credentium,' ('Salvation of believers'). "The flagship commander the Roman Pontiff standing at the helm, strains every muscle to steer his ship between the two columns, from whose summit hang many anchors, and strong hooks linked to chains. The entire enemy fleet closes in, to intercept and sink the flagship at all costs. They bombard it with everything they have: books and pamphlets, incendiary bombs, firearms, cannons. The battle rages ever more furious. Beaked prows ram the flagship again and again, but to no avail, as, unscathed and undaunted, it keeps on its course. At times a formidable ram splinters a gaping hole into its hull, but, immediately, a breeze from the two columns instantly seals the gash.

"Meanwhile, enemy cannons blow up; firearms and beaks fall to pieces; ships crack up and sink to the bottom. In a blind fury, the enemy takes to hand to hand combat, cursing and blaspheming. Suddenly the Pope falls, seriously wounded. He is instantly helped up, but, struck a second time, dies. A shout of victory rises from the enemy, and wild rejoicing sweeps their ships. But no sooner is the Pope dead, than another takes his place. The captains of the auxiliary ships elected him so quickly, that the news of the Pope's death coincides with that of his successor's election. The enemy's self assurance wanes.

"Breaking through all resistance, the new Pope steers his ships safely between the two coiumns; first, to the one surmounted by the Host, and then to the other, topped by the statue of the Virgin. At this point, something unexpected happens. The enemy ships panic and disperse, colliding with and scuttling each other.

"Some auxiliary ships, which had gallantly fought alongside their flagship, are the first to tie up at the two columns. Many others, which had fearfully kept far away from the fight, stand still, cautiously waiting until the wrecked enemy ships vanish under the waves. Then they, too, head for the two columns, tie up at the swinging hooks, and ride safe and tranquil beside their flagship. A great calm now covers the sea..." SBB. (Memoirs, Vol. Vll, 107-108.)


Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

The picture of St John Bosco and children borrowed from Da Mihi Animas*

*Give me Souls.

...que vous vous aimiez l'un l'autre...

"...This is my commandment, that you love one another, as I have loved you." John 15:12 Douay Rheims

A slip, a scary splash, then a scream. It took just seconds for a two-year-old girl to fall 20 feet into New York's East River waters.

Many reacted quickly to rescue 2-year-old Bridgette Sheriden, but two men reacted even faster: Bridgette's father David Anderson and a still unknown French tourist who, after helping in the rescue, walked way and took a cab to destinations unknown.

Part of the rescue was captured on film by a freelance TV producer, himself visiting the South Street Seaport with his family. more...

Photos may be found here...

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

5.4.10

Jesuit Mission Easter, Haec dies


Abenaki Motet: Haec dies
Manuscript of the Abenaki Mission of Saint Francois-de-Sales*,
Music French School, c. 1700-1730.

If we were to be so privileged as to be transported back in time to a typical Jesuit mission in New France on Easter we might hear this motet.

...This very beautiful "motet" is typical of the sort of music heard at various Abenaki missions in New France before the Fall of Quebec in 1759. The music is taken from a variety of known sources including works by André Campra and Henry Du Mont (1610-1684). The sacred text of Haec dies drawn from Psalm 117 and is associated with liturgical rites that celebrate the feast-day of Easter...

Haec dies quam fecit Dominus
exultemus et laetemur in ea. Alleluia.

Confitemini Domino quoniam bonus
quoniam in saeculum misericordia ejus.


Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

Music and partial narritive borrowed from the Deerfield 1704 museum site.

Saint Francois-de-Sales mission, called St Francis, was attacked by Rogers Rangers during the French and Indian War in October 1759. Ranger claims of 300 killed were probably exagerated, the French claimed the Rangers killed 30, mostly women and defenseless children, besides burning the foodstuffs for the upcoming winter. The attack was fictionalized in a 1937 book, Northwest Passage, by Kenneth Roberts.

The Work of Le Nôtre

A redirect from Tea at Trianon, about the archetect of the Gardens at Versailles...



André Le Nôtre, by Carlo Maratta, italien, 1625-1713. In this portrait he wears the order of Chevaliers de le Saint Espirit.

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

Child abuse scandal cost US Catholic church $3 billion

Here is an interesting article from the APF, by Mira Oberman.

I do not think that Ms. Oberman will ever read this article I am writing but I will explain this one more time...

...In most sex abuse cases the predator priest is called a pedophile. This is not true, as in the case linked above the perpitrator is a ephebophile or a pederast, in other words a homosexual man who is attracted to post-pubescient male. These are homosexuals. It is the homosexual culture that promotes the word pedophile so as to disassociate it with the word homosexual, as if there was a difference... See pederast.

Of course linking a homosexual to a paedophile is not a welcome comparison, as we are being led to believe that homosexuals are not deviant, in fact they are more normal than non-homosexuals. Anyone who makes the connexion is likely to be called a homophobe. A little research could have prevented this error, unless, the author intended to convey that the priests are not homosexual, yet it was not priests but homosexuals who founded NAMBLA ***(Do not go to this site unless you have a strong stomach.)***

Then to the modernist forces of the NCR a very liberal Catholic newspaper, ammunition is being provided. I should think that they understand the meaning of the "Seal of the Confessional, yet they, (those Catholics intent or destroying the Church)are calling for the Pope to open >"...up all the records about sex crimes that the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith is holding and he would turn it over to police." Now that is not going to happen and they know it. Every Catholic is concerned by these abusers, but only those intent on bringing the church down are so adamant for revenge in their reaction to it.

In their plan, after the Catholics the same people who attack the church now will be going after the Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Lutherans, and Baptist communities.

How have I come to his conclusion? Of the 88 or so inmates on my case load, about half are sex offenders.

by Mira Oberman, Mon Apr 5, 8:31 am ET

CHICAGO (AFP) – The pedophile priest crisis has cost the Roman Catholic church nearly $3 billion in the United States, but only a fraction of the perpetrators have been jailed and little been done to punish those who covered up the crimes.

After years of painful revelations, massive payouts, soul searching and reforms, the child sex abuse scandal has spread across the globe and in recent weeks has struck the Church at its very core.

Pope Benedict XVI, long celebrated for speaking out against abuse, is facing allegations that he helped protect predator priests when he was archbishop of Munich and later as the Vatican's chief morals enforcer.

"We now face the largest institutional crisis in centuries, possibly in church history," the US-based National Catholic Reporter wrote in an editorial demanding "direct answers" from the Holy Father.

The independent newspaper decried the "mismanagement" of the crisis and insisted that "the strategies employed so far -- taking the legal path, obscuring the truth, and doing everything possible to protect perpetrators as well as the church's reputation and treasury -- have failed miserably."

A CBS News poll released on Friday showed more than two thirds of Americans think the pope has done a bad job in handling the crisis. His favorability rating among US Catholics has fallen to 27 percent from 40 percent in 2006.

The allegations currently sweeping across Europe bear a stark similarity to those that first surfaced in the United States in the mid 1980s.

Victims were intimidated into silence. Abusive priests were left unpunished, or shuffled to unsuspecting parishes where they found new prey. Related article: Victim's long-running crusade to expose abuse

The solutions sought by US bishops are a good model for how the church at large should handle the crisis, said Nicholas Cafardi, a respected canonical law professor and author of "Before Dallas," a history of the clergy child sex abuse crisis.

"We're still in a trust rebuilding process," Cafardi told AFP. "But the only thing that turned that around was the very drastic action the bishops took in 2002."

After years of inaction, the United States Conference of Bishops developed a charter governing how the church would protect children that included a zero tolerance policy, background checks and prevention training.

It also established a National Review Board led by lay people to monitor progress and granted access to church files for researchers from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

They found that more than 4,392 Catholic priests and deacons sexually abused at least 10,677 American children between 1950 and 2002.

Just 615 of those incidents had been reported to law enforcement and only 384 clergy members were criminally charged, resulting in 252 convictions.

More than 700 priests and deacons were removed from or voluntarily left ministry between January 2002 and December 2003 due to allegations of sexual abuse.

A further 3,091 abusive clergy and 4,568 victims were identified from 2004 through 2009, according to a report published last month.

In a sign of progress, just 30 of the 398 allegations reported last year were perpetrated since 1990.

Six dioceses declared bankruptcy in the wake of massive court settlements and more could follow as more cases work their way through the courts, said John Allen, senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter.

"There is considerable debate about whether the church has overcome it or not," Allen said.

"Predictions of a massive implosion (of attendance and donations to) the church didn't come true, so in that sense the church seems to have weathered the storm, but there is significant debate as to how adequate the church's response has been."

While predatory priests have been held accountable, only one American bishop, Cardinal Bernard Law of Boston, lost his job despite evidence of widespread, institutionalized cover-ups, Allen noted.

Church officials also continue to fight attempts to waive the statute of limitation on abuse claims and some bishops refuse to release key church documents or identify the priests who have been defrocked for sexual abuse.

"You still have predators in ministry and they're only being removed from ministry when there is external pressure to get them removed," insists Barbara Blaine, president of the Chicago-based Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests.

"If the pope were sincere, he would be opening up all the records about sex crimes that the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith is holding and he would turn it over to police."


God save the Pope...
Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

Posting

I am sorry for not posting very much, I have been extraordinarily busy last week. I will try to make up for it this week.

Happy Easter,
Brantigny

4.4.10

The True Cross

“Why do you seek the living one among the dead?
He is not here, but he has been raised.

This is a relic of the True Cross, located at the Adoration Chapel of Sacred Heart Parish in Danville, Virgina. I think it is symbolic that just a few feet away is a the Tabernacle in which resides the risen Christ in the Blessed Sacrament.

At daybreak on the first day of the week
the women who had come from Galilee with Jesus
took the spices they had prepared
and went to the tomb.
They found the stone rolled away from the tomb;
but when they entered,
they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus.
While they were puzzling over this, behold,
two men in dazzling garments appeared to them.
They were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground.
They said to them,
“Why do you seek the living one among the dead?
He is not here, but he has been raised.
Remember what he said to you while he was still in Galilee,
that the Son of Man must be handed over to sinners
and be crucified, and rise on the third day.”
And they remembered his words.
Then they returned from the tomb
and announced all these things to the eleven
and to all the others.
The women were Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James;
the others who accompanied them also told this to the apostles,
but their story seemed like nonsense
and they did not believe them.
But Peter got up and ran to the tomb,
bent down, and saw the burial cloths alone;
then he went home amazed at what had happened
.

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

Sacred Heart Parish, Danville Va,