29.12.09

Thoughts Inspired by the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, Part I

From December 26, Matthew Palardy at Et Lux in Tenebris Lucet! considers the penalty of having the Church owing it's allegance not to God but to the state.

...On this day, St. Stephen's Day, in 1790, one of the most damaging pieces of legislation in the Western world became law. France's revolutionary government required all clergy to swear loyalty to the civil constitution--and indeed, this was the revolution at its mildest, before Robespierre and the Terror. Certainly, allegiance of the Church to the sovereign or state had been something strongly promoted before the Revolution, during the age of "enlightened despotry" (Gallicanism, Febronianism, etc.), and we can of course not forget that so many Protestant Churches were state-churches.


On this day, St. Stephen's Day, in 1790, one of the most damaging pieces of legislation in the Western world became law. France's revolutionary government required all clergy to swear loyalty to the civil constitution--and indeed, this was the revolution at its mildest, before Robespierre and the Terror. Certainly, allegiance of the Church to the sovereign or state had been something strongly promoted before the Revolution, during the age of "enlightened despotry" (Gallicanism, Febronianism, etc.), and we can of course not forget that so many Protestant Churches were state-churches...
More?

Thank you Matthew and a tip of the beret.

St. Louis XVI pray for us.

Jhesu+Marie,
Brantigny

1 comment:

Matthew Palardy said...

Thank you for the link, Richard. I hope to building this into a longer series.