18.5.09

A tale of Weddings

It must be getting close to June...

Today I take a minute to redirect the reader to to Elena-Maria's blog the oft mentioned Tea at Trianon and to Catherine Delors work Versailles and More. Both of these women have writen articles which compliment each other, (they often do, it is uncanny) today these are on weddings in the 18th century and one in particular. I have learned the hard way not to dispute anything they write on subects distaff. I just link....

...He had not seen her for more than a total of six hours, but he promised to be faithful to her until death, and she promised the same to him...

~from Trianon by Elena Maria Vidal



On Wednesday, the l6th of May, at nine o'clock, Marie Antoinette left La Muette for Versailles, where her toilette was to take place. The king and the dauphin had preceded her the evening before. When she arrived at the chateau, the king received her on the ground-floor, discoursed for some time with her, and presented to her Madame Elisabeth, the Comtesse de Clermont, and the Princesse de Conti. At one o'clock she went to the apartment of the king, whence the cortege started for the chapel.

The dauphin and the dauphiness, followed by the old monarch, advanced toward the altar and knelt on a cushion placed on the steps of the sanctuary. The archbishop of Rheims, Monseigneur de la Roche-Aymon, grand almoner, offered them the holy water, then after having exhorted the young couple, blessed the thirteen pieces of gold and the ring. The dauphin took the ring and placed it on the fourth ringer of the dauphiness, and gave her the gold-pieces. The archbishop pronounced the nuptial benediction, and as soon as the king had returned to his prie-Dieu, opened the mass. The royal choir sang a motet by the Abbe de Ganzargue; after the offertory the dauphin and dauphiness went to make their offering. At the Pater a canopy of silver brocade was spread above their heads, — the bishop of Senlis, Monseigneur de Roquelaure, grand almoner to the king, holding it on the side of the dauphin, and the bishop of Chartres, grand almoner to the dauphiness, holding it on the side of that princess.
More

Catherine Delors writes that the fashion of the day was far different than today.
The Marquise de La Tour du Pin recalls in her Memoirs her wedding day...

Let us not forget the bride’s attire. It was very simple. I had a dress of white crepe adorned with a handsome trim of Brussels lace and dangling barbes – one did not wear any bonnet or veil then – a bouquet of orange blossoms on my head and one to my side. For the dinner I put on a white toque, adorned with white feathers, to which I had affixed a bouquet of orange blossoms. more...

I remember when my youngest daughter Genevieve was preparing for her wedding day, as many fathers I just paid the bill and let my wife, and daughter alone...

Thanks and a Tip of the beret to Mesdames Vidal and Delors.

Catherine Delors is the Authoress of Mistress of the Revolution.

Dieu le Roy.
Brantigny

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