28.3.08

A lesson in vigilant civics

I have never made it a secret in this blog how I feel when the nation is in jeapordy. I have in the almost year I have opened this blog attempted with some small sucess to remain on the topic of monarchism. There are times when "the best laid schemes o' mice an' men gang aft a-gley". This is one of those times. I am reproducing an article which appeared in the Baltimore Sun yesterday 27 Mar 2008. It concerns a fellow (former)Marine. I have never met this Marine; we were stationed at the same duty station, Marine Barracks Sigonela Sicily, albeit several years apart. I was and remains my favorite duty station. When I was stationed there it was a platoon sized unit, which numbered about 40 Marines (a platoon), and had grown by the time George Tarburton, to near company size. It was and is a small fraternity. we depended on each other to watch our back, in the "'ville" or at the "site".

One thing which is drilled into the head of a Marine is Duty, and Honor. If you are not offended by the story below you should be. George Tarburton did not do what he thought was right, he did what he knew was right. My former Sergeant-Major Maxmillian Swartenbach would say to me, "Gunny, Right is right, and wrong is wrong. It takes moral courage to do what is right, so those with physical courage can do what needs to be done. Anyone can have physical courage, but it takes a man to have moral courage." While we are at war, we have politicians here at home who desire power so much and are so unwilling to stand up for what is right that they turn their back on the average citizen. These are moral cowards. They are also beneath any contempt.

A Lesson in Vigilant Civics

Dan Rodricks
March 27, 2008

I do not know if we still have civics teachers in Maryland - or if they are called that anymore, or if teachers even have time to introduce the concept of citizenship to their students - but, if so, I think they should consider the Tarburton lesson plan. It went over big at a high school in Massachusetts, leading to a great class discussion about the need for vigilant citizenship, the honor in personal sacrifice and the importance of acting on principle for the greater good.

Robert M. Bell, chief justice of the Maryland Court of Appeals, serves as honorary chairman of the Maryland Center for the Study of History and Civic Education, which promotes teaching initiatives in those subjects. The organization lists lesson plans on its Web site. Judge Bell and the other dignitaries associated with this group might want to add Tarburton to the list.

It goes like this:

George Tarburton, a veteran Maryland Transportation Authority cop, lost his job because he blew the whistle on security lapses in the port of Baltimore during a time when the federal, state and city governments had made homeland security a priority. Unable to get his superiors to attend to what he considered problems - dilapidated fences, malfunctioning alarms, busted surveillance cameras, unattended gates, patrol boats hardly ever used - Tarburton assisted a Sun reporter with a newspaper expose. After his superiors identified him as the Sun's source, they accused Tarburton of violating his department's rules and offered him resignation or dismissal.
Tarburton chose resignation.

Now, two years later, he regrets signing off on this job and the right to reapply for it.

He feels he had acted in the public interest and that a vindictive superior railroaded him out of a job he had for 17 years.

With a new governor in Annapolis, Tarburton has asked to have his old job back, or one similar. However, the O'Malley administration has done nothing to correct the injustice, and Tarburton remains a classic example of the whistleblower hung out to dry.

In Massachusetts, one of his old Marine Corps buddies, Paul Jancewicz, was outraged when he caught wind of Tarburton's dilemma.

Jancewicz teaches history and law at Amesbury High School in Massachusetts, north of Boston. He presented Tarburton's story to his students as a lesson in citizenship.

"I asked my pupils what they thought was correct - saving a job or putting forth the truth for the betterment of society, for security," Jancewicz wrote in an e-mail. "Most students were amazed that a person could be fired for questioning authority. This from the same students who no longer find critical thinking in the curriculum, as test scores seem to now trump such things.

"While they were generally upset to learn that you can be fired for telling the truth, all in all it has been a great learning experience for them - unfortunately, at the expense of a man of integrity, who listened to his inner voice and paid a high price for it."

Jancewicz suggested his students write about the Tarburton case - in part to comfort his old Marine Corps comrade.

"I did not lead my pupils to write what they wrote of the Tarburton Travesty, as I now call it," he added in a subsequent e-mail. "I introduced it as the Tarburton Affair - and I read to them the bare bones of the situation. Within the law course I offer up the need to have an open mind, to see what it is to walk a mile in the shoes of another."

Here are some of the short notes and excerpts of essays written by Jancewicz's students and sent to Tarburton at his home in Dundalk.

Nicholas Eaton: "I was very happy to hear what you did because it was the honorable thing to do. One of the things that my father has always taught me is being honorable. I often get upset because I see how people have no honor and so it made me happy to hear that you did what you believed was right, though others didn't have the courage to do it themselves. I am disgusted that you were treated the way you were."

Leigha Goodwin: "I always thought that, after September 11, people would work harder to make us safe. If our country wants us to feel safe, how can they condemn you? If there are problems with our safety, we will never know it because the people who do know it will be afraid to make it better at the consequence of losing their jobs. ... You know what you did was right, and don't let anybody put you down. Things like this only make you stronger."

Danielle Almon: "Thank you for taking a stand for what you believe in. It was the right thing to do."

Samantha Standring: "Nobody had the right to punish you for speaking up for yourself as well as the country. Stay strong and don't forget - everything happens for a reason. I respect you for what you did and I know goodness will come your way."

Mike Salisbury: "Thank you for doing the right thing."

Allow me to add to this civics lesson plan by suggesting that the next round of letters go to:

Martin O'Malley, Governor, 100 State Circle, Annapolis, Md. 21401.

His Email form, may be accessed here...

And if any Maryland students want to get in on this, please, have at it.

Dan Rodricks
dan.rodricks@baltsun.com

He can be heard on Midday, Mondays through Thursdays, noon to 2 p.m., on 881. WYPR-FM

I know that my blog is read in 29 different countries, and most of the 50 United States and the territories as well so please send a comment to the good governor of Maryland, let him know that the world is watching him.

"Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more, you should never wish to do less."
R.E.Lee

An earlier article may be found here...

Thanks and a tip of the beret to Dan Rodricks, of the Baltimore Sun.

Citation: Dan Rodricks, A lesson in vigilant civics 27 march 2008. Baltimore Sun.

Semper Fidelis.
de Brantigny (dit) Boisvert
Marine Barracks Naples Italy,
Marine Guard Det. Sigonella 1974-1976

27.3.08

Louis XVII DE FRANCE

27 mars 1785 - 8 juin 1795
St Denis France

Sur l'anniversaire de la naissance du Roi perdu...

L'innocente victime, au terrestre séjour,
N'a vu que le printemps qui lui donna le jour.
Rien n'est resté de lui qu'un nom, un vain nuage,
Un souvenir, un songe, une invisible image.
Adieu, fragile enfant échappé de nos bras ;
Adieu, dans la maison d'où l'on ne revient pas.
Nous ne te verrons plus, quand de moissons couverte
La campagne d'été rend la ville déserte ;
Dans l'enclos paternel nous ne te verrons plus,
De tes pieds, de tes mains, de tes flancs demi-nus,

Presser l'herbe et les fleurs dont les nymphes de Seine
Couronnent tous les ans les coteaux de Lucienne.
L'axe de l'humble char à tes jeux destiné,
Par de fidèles mains avec toi promené,
Ne sillonnera plus les prés et le rivage.
Tes regards, ton murmure, obscur et doux langage,
N'inquiéteront plus nos soins officieux ;
Nous ne recevrons plus avec des cris joyeux
Les efforts impuissants de ta bouche vermeille
A bégayer les sons offerts à ton oreille.
Adieu, dans la demeure où nous nous suivrons tous,
Où ta mère déjà tourne ses yeux jaloux.

La Coeur de Louis-Charles


















Prion pour nous, Louis.
Vive le Roy.
de Brantigny

Base de Donnees Iconographique sur les derniers temps de la monarchie Francais. cliqez ici

Louis XVII et L'ADN, La Verité, cliqez ici

"La Parisienne"(1815) Refrain Officiel de la restauration. cliquez ici...

Iraq War protesters disrupt Easter Mass at Holy Name-Chicago

I can not understand the complexities of the American mind. So for all those who read this blog and at the cost of some readers let me say once and for all I am squarely amongst those who wish to prosecute the war on terror. Islam is not a religion of peace. Having said that I will continue and say that I do not believe it has been prosecuted correctly for the last 5 years. No matter what the politicians of the liberal faction say it will not be over the day that he or she is sworn in. So lets just get that out of the way right now. I believe that there are people who do not wish the United States to be at war, and that they find war terrible. Most of those are in the military. I know this because that was my profession for most of my life. ...And there are people who want the United States out of the war because it is a power trip. They life in the glory days of the Vietnam War protest days. These people just want to protest. The people I am writing about here are numbered among those. These are radicals who are foolish. They play into te hands of the enemy. This enemy, were it in control would be cuttng off the heads of those who are now protesting. These protesters disrupt life and make enemies of those who might be won to their side by their foolish actions.

Sunday, Easter, a group of protesters disrupted Mass on the most important feast of the Catholic calendar.

Six people were arrested at Holy Name parish’s auditorium Sunday after disrupting an Easter mass to protest the Iraq war.

The group—whose female and male members identified themselves as Catholic Schoolgirls Against the War—stood up at the beginning of Cardinal Francis George’s homily and shouted their opposition to the conflict, which marked its fifth anniversary last week. As security guards and ushers tried to remove them from the service, the demonstrators squirted fake blood on themselves and parishioners dressed in their Easter finery.

The red substance, which one protester later described as “stage blood,” initially drew gasps and a few terrified yelps from the 600 worshipers at the mass. The shock, however, quickly transformed into anger as people booed the six while they were escorted from the parish auditorium.

The protesters were all charged with felony criminal damage to property and two counts of simple battery for squirting the blood around the auditorium and onto worshipers’ clothes, authorities said. Chicago police identified the six arrested as Donte D. Smith, 18; Ephran Ramirez Jr., 22; Ryane Ziemba, 25; Mercedes Phinaih, 18; Regan Maher, 25; and Angela Haban, 20.

Sometimes it is better to keep your mouth shut and let people think you a fool then to open your mouth and remove all doubt.

de Brantigny

26.3.08

Imperial Crown of Austria

I thought that as today is the 89th anniversary of the suspension of the Austia-Hungarian Empire as the Austro-Hungarian Imperial and Royal Family arrived at the Austro-Swiss border in an Imperial train and departed Austria, that it would not be amiss to present the Imperial Crown of Austria.
more
Crown of the Austrian Empire

The Crown of the Austrian Empire (German: Österreichische Kaiserkrone or Krone des Kaisertums Österreich) was originally the personal crown of emperor Rudolf II. It is therefore also known as the Crown of Rudolf II, or the Crown of the Austrian Empire.

History

Because the Imperial Regalia of the Holy Roman Empire, especially the Imperial Crown, were all kept in Nürnberg and could only leave the city for the coronation, some rulers had their own personal crowns made. For example, when they attended a session of the Reichstag (Imperial Diet), they attended with their own crowns. The oldest depiction of such a private crown is an etching by the artist Albrecht Dürer of Emperor Maximilian I, where a depiction of a crown is seen that might have influenced the appearance of the crown of Rudolf later.

The Imperial Crown was actually never used for a coronation, since the Empire of Austria, as opposed to the Holy Roman Empire, was a hereditary monarchy under the Habsburg Dynasty, and therefore such an act of legitimization was not seen as necessary. The ceremony was more an act of investiture on the monarch's official ascension to the throne.

The crown of Rudolf II was made in 1602 in Prague by Jan Vermeyen, one of the most outstanding goldsmiths of his time, who was called specially from Antwerp. The crown is made out of three parts: the circlet (Kronreif), the high arch (Kronbügel), and a mitre (Mitra). It therefore follows the model of the mitral crowns, which derive their shape from the cap of bishops.

Circlet

Francis I, the first emperor of Austria, wearing the Austrian Imperial Crown and regalia

The circlet in itself forms a crown — the mitre and the high arch were put in extra, so to speak. It symbolises the royal authority. Out of it rise eight lilies, which were probably inspired by the Bohemian Crown of St. Wenceslas. The lilies are also sometimes associated with the fleurs-de-lis of the Valois. The numeral eight is a theme that was also taken from the Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire, since the circlet is made out of eight plates. In the circlet are precious stones such as spinels, zircons, and pearls. The zircons are cut in such a way that they are flat at the front. The cutting of precious stones was back then a relatively new technique.

Mitre

The mitre symbolises the divine right to rule, and the spiritual position of the emperor: during the coronation, he was also consecrated symbolically as a deacon. It is turned by 90 °, the areas are shown to the side, so that the high arch goes from the front to the back, just as in the Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire. The mitre is made out of gold, with a band of enamel work, which depicts birds and plants. The mitre is divided into four sections, which represent the high honours of Rudolf II. The first part shows him kneeling, while receiving the Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire in Regensburg as Holy Roman Emperor. The second shows him riding onto the coronation hill in Bratislava during his coronation as King of Hungary. The third shows his coronation procession through Prague as King of Bohemia, and the fourth depicts an allegory of his victory over the invading Turks, although historically that is not quite correct. The inscription inside the arch reads in Latin: RVDOLPHVS II ROM(ANORVM) IMP(ERATOR) AVGVSTUS HVNG(ARIAE) ET BOH(EMIAE) REX CONSTRVXIT MDCII (Made for Rudolf II, Roman Emperor, King of Hungary and Bohemia, in 1602).

High Arch

The high arch was obviously inspired by the arch from the Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire. It is studded with eight diamonds, which symbolise Christ. The emperor was regarded as governor on earth in the name of Christ. At the top of the arch is a blue-green emerald, which symbolises heaven. The emerald was not cut, but polished.

Sceptre and Orb and Imperial Crown of Austria

Also belonging to the crown are a sceptre and the Imperial Orb, which was commissioned in 1612 by Rudolf's brother and successor Matthias. It was created by Andreas Ochsenbruck. The shape takes its inspiration from the crown, especially the enamel-work has been copied in its style. A peculiarity of the sceptre is that it is made partly out of "unicorn horn". The sceptre and the orb were already in use before proclamation of the Empire of Austria, sometimes as the Bohemian royal regalia, sometimes for the hereditary private estates (Erbhuldigung) of the Archduchy of Austria.

The crown, sceptre, and orb are kept today in the Schatzkammer Imperial Treasury, in the Hofburg Palace in Vienna, Austria.

An iteresting article from 1921 may be found here...

Photos of the last Emperor and Empress may be found here...

Information on the jewels and exhibits may be found here...

Long Live the Kaiser!


"Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser"

Thanks and a tip of the beret to J.K. Baltzersen for keeping my dates straight.

de Brantigny

25.3.08

Anti-War protesters interrupt Easter Mass

I can not understand the complexities of the American mind. So for all those who read this blog and at the cost of some readers let me say once and for all I am squarely amongst those who wish to prosecute the war on terror. Islam is not a religion of peace. Having said that I will continue and say that I do not believe it has been prosecuted correctly for the last 5 years. No matter what the politicians of the liberal faction say it will not be over the day that he or she is sworn in. So lets just get that out of the way right now. I believe that there are people who do not wish the United States to be at war, and that they find war terrible. Most of those are in the military. I know this because that was my profession for most of my life. ...And there are people who want the United States out of the war because it is a power trip. They life in the glory days of the Vietnam War protest days. These people just want to protest. The people I am writing about here are numbered among those. These are radicals who are foolish. They play into te hands of the enemy. This enemy, were it in control would be cuttng off the heads of those who are now protesting. These protesters disrupt life and make enemies of those who might be won to their side by their foolish actions.

Sunday, Easter, a group of protesters disrupted Mass on the most important feast of the Catholic calendar.

Six people were arrested at Holy Name parish’s auditorium Sunday after disrupting an Easter mass to protest the Iraq war.

The group—whose female and male members identified themselves as Catholic Schoolgirls Against the War—stood up at the beginning of Cardinal Francis George’s homily and shouted their opposition to the conflict, which marked its fifth anniversary last week. As security guards and ushers tried to remove them from the service, the demonstrators squirted fake blood on themselves and parishioners dressed in their Easter finery.

The red substance, which one protester later described as “stage blood,” initially drew gasps and a few terrified yelps from the 600 worshipers at the mass. The shock, however, quickly transformed into anger as people booed the six while they were escorted from the parish auditorium.

The protesters were all charged with felony criminal damage to property and two counts of simple battery for squirting the blood around the auditorium and onto worshipers’ clothes, authorities said. Chicago police identified the six arrested as Donte D. Smith, 18; Ephran Ramirez Jr., 22; Ryane Ziemba, 25; Mercedes Phinaih, 18; Regan Maher, 25; and Angela Haban, 20.


A video may be seen here...

I wanted to publish this yesterday, I am sorry this is late.

de Brantigny

Couronne Louis XV

The Crown of Louis XV is the sole surviving crown from the French ancien regime among the French Crown Jewels.

Until the beginning of the 18th century French kings wore plain crowns unembellished with precious stones. This was changed by King Louis XV in 1722, when he had a new crown created, which he had embellished with diamonds from the Royal Collection. He wore it at his coronation.

The new crown was made by Laurent Ronde, the French Crown jeweller. It originally contained collection of Mazarin Diamonds and the famous 'Regent' diamond,(1) which was set in the front of the crown, as well as hundreds of other precious diamonds, rubies, emeralds and sapphires.

All of France's older crowns were lost, stolen or destroyed during the French revolution. The crown of Louis XV was the only one to survive.

In 1885 the French Third Republic decided to sell the Crown Jewels. Given its historic importance, the crown of Louis XV was kept, though its precious stones were replaced by glass.

It is on permanent display in the Louvre museum in Paris.

(1) Regent Diamond: The gem was sold to Philip II, Duke of Orleans in 1717, then Regent of France, for about $650,000; since that time, it has been known as the Regent Diamond. It was set in the crown of Crown of Louis XV and worn at his coronation in February, 1723. Removed from the crown, it was worn by Queen Marie Leczinska in her hair. Two generations later, when the French Crown Jewels were adorned the Royal Family in many different kinds of personal ornaments, Marie Antoinette used the Regent to adorn a large black-velvet hat.

The coveted gem disappeared, together with the equally famous Sancy and French Blue (from which the Hope was cut), when the Garde Meuble (Royal Treasury) was robbed of it's fabulous jewels in 1792, during the early part of the Revolution. Some of the gems were soon recovered, but the Regent could not at first be traced. After fifteen months, however, it was found, having been secreted in a hole under the timberwork of a Paris garret.

In 1797, the great gem was pledged for money that helped Napolean in his ride to power. He had in mounted in the hilt of his sword that he carried at his coronation in 1804. When Napolean went into exile in Elba in 1814, Marie Louisa, his second wife, carried the Regent to the Chateau of Blois. Later, however, her father, Emperor Francis I of Austria, returned it to France and it again became part of the French Crown Jewels.

In 1825, Charles X wore the Regent at his coronation; it remained in the Royal Crown until the time of Napolean III. Then, a place was made for it in a Greek diadem designed for Empress Eugenie.

Many of the French Crown Jewels were sold at auction in 1887, but the Regent was reserved from the sale and exhibited at the Louvre amoung the national treasures. In 1940, when the Germans invaded Paris, it was sent to the chateau country, this time to Chambord, where it was secreted behind a stone panel. After the War, it was returned to Paris and put on display in the Apollon Gallery of the Louvre Museum. It was one of the features of the Ten Centuries of French Jewelry exhibition at the Museum in 1962. An alternate name sometimes used is the Millionaire Diamond.
Source: DIAMONDS - Famous, Notable and Unique

France Moderne

de Brantigny

Imperial Crown of Russia

Imperial Crown of Russia

The Imperial Crown of Russia, or the Great Imperial Crown, is the crown that was used by the Emperors of Russia until the abolition of the monarchy in 1917. The Great Imperial Crown was first used in a coronation by the Emperor Paul I of Russia. The last coronation was in 1896 for Nicholas II. It is currently on display in the Moscow Kremlin Armoury.

By 1613, when Michael Romanov, the first Tsar of the Romanov Dynasty was crowned, the Russian regalia included a pectoral cross, a golden chain, barmas (wide ceremonial collar), the Crown of Monomakh, sceptre and orb. Over the centuries, various Tsars had fashioned their own private crowns, modeled for the most part after the Crown of Monomakh, but these were for personal use and not for the coronation.

In 1719, Tsar Peter I "the Great" founded the earliest version of what we now know as the State Diamond Fund of the Russian Federation. Peter had visited other European nations, and introduced many innovations to Russia, one of which was the creation of a permanent fund (фонд) to house a collection of jewels which belonged not to the Romanov family, but to the Russian State. Peter placed all of the regalia in this fund and declared that the state holdings were inviolate, and could not be altered, sold, or given away - and he also decreed that each subsequent Emperor or Empress should leave a certain number of pieces acquired during their reign to the State, for the permanent glory of the Russian Empire.

From this collection came a new set of regalia, including eventually the Great Imperial Crown, to replace the Crown of Monomakh and other crowns used by earlier Russian Tsars and Grand Princes of Muscovy, as a symbol of the adoption of the new title of Emperor (1721).

Following the tradition of the Byzantine Emperors, the Tsar of Russia placed the crown upon his own head. This left no doubt that, in the Russian system, the imperial power came directly from God. The prayer of the Metropolitan, similar to that of the Patriarch of Constantinople for the Byzantine Emperor, confirmed the imperial supremacy.

After the Tsar recited the Nicene Creed as a profession of faith, and after an invocation of the Holy Ghost and a litany, the emperor assumed the purple chlamys, and the crown was then presented to him.

He would take it and place it on his head himself, while the Metropolitan recited: "In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen."

The Metropolitan would then make the following short address:
"Most God-fearing, absolute, and mighty Lord, Tsar of all the Russias, this visible and tangible adornment of thy head is an eloquent symbol that thou, as the head of the whole Russian people, art invisibly crowned by the King of kings, Christ, with a most ample blessing, seeing that He bestows upon thee entire authority over His people."

The last occasion on which the Great Imperial Crown was officially used was the State Opening of the Duma in 1906.

An a capella version of the Tsarist anthem.


de Brantigny

American Conservatives and Liberals—A Whiggish Tradition[1]

Mark at Durandal has some insight about the American conservatives. I truth there has been no conservative in America since 1783 when the loyalists were forced into exile and their propety was siezed. So much for liberty. Of course that is until now, with the Monarchist league about to be formed.

American Conservatives and Liberals—A Whiggish Tradition[1]

The reason behind the similarities between the American right and left can be explained by the fact they are nothing more than the two halves of the leftist Whig party. This is also why so called American “paleoconservatives” champion Edmund Burke as the father of “Anglo-American conservativism”.[2] It is true that Burke rejected the Jacobin mania, but it is hardly true that he was a true counter-revolutionary. Burke was an “Old Whig”, that is to say, he was more reserved in his progressivism than the “New Whigs” who were more overt champions of the Enlightenment doctrines. This is why a conservative liberal like Burke qualifies as a rightist conservative in Whiggish America
. ...more.

Thanks and a tip of the beret to Mark Amesse.

de Brantigny