22.6.08

Armistice with France

"HERE ON THE ELEVENTH OF NOVEMBER 1918 SUCCUMBED THE CRIMINAL PRIDE OF THE GERMAN REICH. VANQUISHED BY THE FREE PEOPLES WHICH IT TRIED TO ENSLAVE."

So read the plaque which marked the spot of the Surrender of the German Empire in the forest of Compiègne in 1918.

22 years later on this date in a deliberate move to humiliate the people of France the train car in which the German Army surrendered was used to force the French Nation to submit to the Nazi Reich.

from Wikipedia...
The Second Armistice at Compiègne was signed at 18:50 on 22 June 1940 near Compiègne, in the department of Oise, between Nazi Germany and France. Following the decisive German victory in the Battle of France (10 May - 21 June 1940), it established a German occupation zone in Northern France that encompassed all English Channel and Atlantic Ocean ports and left the remainder "free" to be governed by the French. Adolf Hitler deliberately chose Compiègne Forest as the site to sign the armistice due to its symbolic role as the site of the 1918 Armistice with Germany that signaled the end of World War I with a German defeat. more

...Restoration of the Armistice Site

After the war, German POW labour was used to restore the armistice site to its former state. The stone tablet's pieces were recovered and reassembled, and a replica of the railway carriage placed at the restored site. The Alsace-Lorraine monument was rebuilt from scratch. After the reunification of Germany in 1989, those who witnessed the event dug up relics and came forth with earlier relics. This was written up in the Südthüringer Zeitung (South Thuringia Newspaper) on 11 May 1991 in an article entitled "Hitler's Salon Wagon Found in the village of Crawinkel". Various components were returned to the French General Gamache in Compiègne in 1992. On 5 May 1994 a small oak commemorating the "hope for peace" was dug up from the destruction site in Crawinkel and transplanted to Compiègne in France. On 7 May 2005 the historic site in Crawinkel was dedicated. [from Dankmar Leffler and Klaus-Peter Schambach book]

Jhesu+Marie,
de Brantigny

It was at Compiègne that the maid was captured by the english, and it was at Compiègne that the marytrs of the Carmelite convent came.

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